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Avant gardening - click opera
February 2010
 
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Sun, Jul. 23rd, 2006 12:33 pm
Avant gardening

Well, I performed a Momus set last night outdoors, standing right in the conceptual garden (the sixth in a series) by Atelier Le Balto. In fact, the avant gardeners even have their office in the Kunst-Werke courtyard.

At a time when territorial invasion has become a malign trend, it's nice to see that a more benign use of territory is also fashionable: the transformation of dead sites into gardens. At Palais de Tokyo in Paris, for instance, as well as two Wild Gardens designed by Atelier Le Balto, you can currently see a show called Tropico-Vegetal. This show takes off from the work of Sergio Vega, whose installation Paradise in the New World at the Venice Biennale was, for me, the highlight of the 2005 show.

At Palais de Tokyo, as curator Marc Sanchez explains in a series of video clips about the show, there are five individual exhibitions, taking off from Vega's conception of tropical South America as both a real and a mythical place. The rest of the shows concentrate on "the zone of vegetation". In an installation called "Through the woods to find the forest", Henrik Hakansson has made sculpture of fallen forest trees and fifty species of orchids suspended from steel cables. His main material is "the universe of the forest, its plants and luxuriant trees, its insects, frogs and serpents".

Based on a 17th century book he found which described (with maps) exactly where to find an earthly paradise in the rain forests of Brasil (a place called Matto Grosso, paradise hunters), Sergio Vega has made an installation called "Un Petit Coin de Paradis", recounting his own rather haphazard experiences tracking down and finding this spot.

The Palais de Tokyo gardens will be dismantled in August, perhaps to be reassembled somewhere else. The idea would please Leipzig-based Atelier Atlas, who make mobile and brief-duration gardens: "A small experimental garden may have a life of but a few moments", they say.

Let's hope that Ian Hamilton-Finlay's conceptual garden at Little Sparta, outside Edinburgh, lasts a wee bit longer.

23CommentReplyShare

zzberlin
zzberlin
hh
Sun, Jul. 23rd, 2006 01:44 pm (UTC)
i just can't stop talking

beautiful sparkling chrystalline pink white image

looks a bit like the set for caligular in pastel


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zzberlin
zzberlin
hh
Sun, Jul. 23rd, 2006 01:45 pm (UTC)
Re: i just can't stop talking

stupid stupid keyboard impatience

> looks a bit like the set for caligular in pastel

that would be caligula


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Sun, Jul. 23rd, 2006 04:16 pm (UTC)

Golly, sounds painful! Hope you're all better now, your Lordship!


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rob.rabiee.myopenid.com
rob.rabiee.myopenid.com
Sun, Jul. 23rd, 2006 08:56 pm (UTC)

Those, Lord Whimsy, are some beautiful pictures. A pleasant visual tincture for a lazy Sunday morning - gratzi!


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rob.rabiee.myopenid.com
rob.rabiee.myopenid.com
Sun, Jul. 23rd, 2006 11:44 pm (UTC)

Your Lordship,

Fantastic! Your garden, I'd guess, is the most fantastic place in New Jersey. Was that "Village Green" video on your site actually shot there? I want to ramble around it that place forever!

Again, thanks for the beautiful greenness. If you can believe it, Glendale isn't exactly the Hanging Gardens of Babylon.


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Jul. 25th, 2006 01:41 pm (UTC)


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heetboven
heetboven
Wed, Nov. 29th, 2006 09:16 pm (UTC)
High Cholesterol

Plants are a good start visit here to learn more:
http://www.lower-cholesterol-secrets.com/


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kementari2
kementari2
The green fuse
Sun, Jul. 23rd, 2006 08:56 pm (UTC)

Lyme, dear Whimsy! I know several people with it - please get rid of it for good and don't let it go chronic. Hope you feel better soon.


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(Anonymous)
Sun, Jul. 23rd, 2006 09:33 pm (UTC)

Why is it that those people on the left who are most fanatically concerned with the environment live in urban areas where their surroundings are 95% glass and concrete? If one had a genuine interest in nature, wouldn't he try to live in nature?

Why is it that city dwellers are politically inclined to the left? Part of it is that there is more sharing: sidewalks, busses, and subways. But I also think when you look around you, and all you see are man-made buildings, you lose an appreciation for the size and majesty of nature, immutable and constant, and you believe that man can create utopia as quickly as he throws up an office building.

-henryperri


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Sun, Jul. 23rd, 2006 11:15 pm (UTC)

It's more ecologically sound to live in a high-density urban environment than in your own free-standing house in the countryside. For instance, I don't know anyone who can live in the countryside without a car, yet here in the city all I need is a bicycle.

Also, I think city-dwellers are more left-wing because they're surrounded by "the other", people of other ethnicities, for instance. This keeps them tolerant.

As for nature being "immutable and constant", I'm reminded of something from the biography of Bertolt Brecht. On one of his many displacements, as he escaped the Nazis, he was living in a house next to a stunning view of mountains. But he moved his writing desk away from the window. He had no interest in a landscape that could not be changed by humans.


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cheapsurrealist
cheapsurrealist
Dave Nold
Sun, Jul. 23rd, 2006 11:50 pm (UTC)

urban areas where their surroundings are 95% glass and concrete?

That 95% figure. You just pulled that out of your ass right?


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(Anonymous)
Mon, Jul. 24th, 2006 12:41 am (UTC)

For somebody twice my age, I would've figured you'd have something more meaningful to contribute.


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cheapsurrealist
cheapsurrealist
Dave Nold
Mon, Jul. 24th, 2006 01:42 am (UTC)

For somebody twice my age, I would've figured you'd have something more meaningful to contribute.

When you get a little older your mommy and daddy might take you to the Big City. They have lot's of candy and ice cream there. And if you're lucky they'll take you to an urban area like San Francisco where natural wonders abound.


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zzberlin
zzberlin
hh
Mon, Jul. 24th, 2006 01:40 am (UTC)
Re: Bumpkins anonymous

<< It's been my experience that most people in cities tend to mean well and talk a good game, but because they are so physically isolated from nature, they can do little in the way of action other than tourism--at which time >>

I'm not a huge nature fan myself. Like momus was saying, the nature vista is unchanging unless there's a thunderstorm. I'd rather eat my cereal and keep an eye on the street below, the cars.

I like to enjoy a sunny day from behind a glass window

I'll take the city, an enclosed orb, underneath the water maybe, now there's something to watch! but not the mountains. BORING


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Mon, Jul. 24th, 2006 06:08 am (UTC)
Re: Bumpkins anonymous

Well, imagining different and better outcomes for ourselves is one of the hallmarks of liberalism, isn't it? The belief in progress? The perfectability of man? The Golden Age being in the future, not the past?


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mandyrose
mandyrose
Mon, Jul. 24th, 2006 01:13 pm (UTC)
Leftist City Dweller

Why is it that "those people" on the right are constantly building ugly subdivisions of identical giant houses in what was unspoiled nature? I'd rather live in a city and use what we've already built, and leave nature to itself thank you. I think that's a much better way of "appreciating" it. Who's creating utopia quickly again?


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