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Can Western people be individuals? - click opera
February 2010
 
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Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 11:57 am
Can Western people be individuals?

Berlin's big event right now is the Berlinale, the annual film festival famous for its golden bear awards. I'm not the world's biggest cinephile, but there have been a few things I've been keen to see. Photographer Mika Ninagawa is showing her first full-length feature, Sakuran (her first short, Cheap Trip, featured the original Momus demo for "Journey to the Centre of Me"). Sakuran features Funky Forest star Anna Tsuchiya as a Yoshiwara oiran, a high class prostitute. Alas, I wasn't able to get tickets (though I'm sure, with the music connection, I could have blagged some if I'd really tried).



Another Asian film that looks interesting is Korean movie I'm A Cyborg, But That's Okay, in which director Park Chan-wook teams up the beautiful, fringed Lim Soo Jung with K-pop star Rain. They basically play charming lunatics -- one uses her grandmother's dentures to communicate with lights and vending machines, the other dons a mask in order to transfer emotional energy between the other inmates of the asylum he's incarcerated in. It's tempting to see this quirkfest (and, again, I wasn't able to get tickets) as a light meditation on conformity versus individuality -- the first trailer begins in a factory straight out of Lang's Metropolis or Wells's The Trial:



And the second delves more into the bizarre sanatorium hijinks of the protagonists, as they discover their (paradoxically robotic) individuality amongst the freaks on the far margins of society:



Watching these trailers, I had two thoughts. First, this Cyborg movie just seems way fresher than anything coming out of the West, and presents characters who are much more interesting and individualistic (just as Ishii's Funky Forest does). Now, cinema is a mirror of society in the sense that it replicates but also reverses it, so it may be that this individuality is precisely what's lacking from Korean society right now. The film does imply that it can only exist amongst the mad and the marginal. But it's also worth thinking about whether we in the West aren't just a teensy bit complacent about our fully-developed individuality. Hollywood films present a much more cookie-cutter view of human personality than these Asian romantic comedies do.

Which leads to the other thought I had. Funky Forest and I'm A Cyborg, But That's Okay are mainstream products that also manage to be intelligent, stylish and quirky. And I can't help thinking that this might only be possible in societies where the majority of film consumers are bright and well-educated. And, as this BBC article covering an OECD league table of educational attainment explains, South Korea has "leapfrogged" many Western countries in the past twenty years. "Young people in South Korea's workforce are more likely to have achieved an upper secondary education than anywhere else in the developed world. They are also among the most likely to have university degrees." Surely, in this context, it should be no surprise that mainstream cultural products -- at least those directed at the young -- would be slightly more intelligent than those from nations lower down the league table?

My native Scotland was long ago overtaken, educationally, by Asian countries. One film I will see this Berlinale is David Mackenzie's Hallam Foe. Set in my hometown of Edinburgh, and employing the off-kilter graphics and cartoons of David Shrigley (yet more apotheosis for the successful scribbler), this is the tale of a boy who's "frankly, a little odd". The trailer does all it can to establish Hallam as a crank before bursting into a song that goes "I am a lone horse rider". Quirky individualism, it seems, is not yet dead. Even in the West.

41CommentReplyShare

sm255
sm255
sm255
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 12:10 pm (UTC)
off topic!

Hi, this has nothing to do with today's post, I'm just sending on a link to an article that I thought you would find interesting, and I would then find your response interesting. http://harpers.org/TheEcstasyOfInfluence.html
-Stephanie


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 12:47 pm (UTC)
Re: off topic!

Great piece, completely destroying the argument that Marxy, for instance, advances over "pakuri".

"Appropriation, mimicry, quotation, allusion, and sublimated collaboration consist of a kind of sine qua non of the creative act, cutting across all forms and genres in the realm of cultural production."

I'm down with that message. Or, as Dizzy Gillespie put it, "You can't steal a gift". And speaking of gift culture, Laurie Taylor examines the phenomenon here.


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(Anonymous)
Fri, Feb. 16th, 2007 12:49 am (UTC)
Re: off topic!

Well, I just find it odd, Momus, that you often write original lyrics and melodies and don't just copy the exact production points, melodies, and lyrical themes of other works. I've known you to sample and reference, but if you love pakuri so much, why don't you just "cover" some other songs, change a few elements, and sell them as your own? Damn your instinct to need to add some level of creative input!

Marxy


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Fri, Feb. 16th, 2007 09:37 am (UTC)
Re: off topic!

Borges' story in which a man re-writes Don Quixote word for word and still creates an original work obviously doesn't mean much to you!


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(Anonymous)
Mon, Feb. 19th, 2007 04:57 am (UTC)
Re: off topic!

You should spend all your time rewriting Borges' story instead of creating your own original songs and essays.

Marxy


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akabe
akabe
alin huma
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 07:14 pm (UTC)
Re: off topic!

yeah, take this Marxy. not pakuri, Erhebung.


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(Anonymous)
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 12:10 pm (UTC)
an interesting theory

and though i am always happy remark upon the sinking intelligence quotient of my native land, i suspect there must be something more at work here. perhaps differing cultural notions of storytelling and personality. that being said i am looking forward to seeing Dasepo Sonyeo \ Dasepo Naughty Girls this weekend, another korean film here with the berlinale. "Fun, sex and lunacy. All hell's been let loose at No Use High School!" with an intro like that who could resist....

William Thirteen


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(Anonymous)
Fri, Feb. 16th, 2007 03:49 pm (UTC)
Re: an interesting theory

Dasepo Naughty Girls was one of my very favorite films last year - and I watched over 300.
Then, if you (like me) can't get enough of the Dasepo stuff, there is a TV series as well, available on 4 DVDs with around 13 hours of material. I'm halfway through those now, and it's the the funniest thing I've seen for years.


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(Anonymous)
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 01:21 pm (UTC)

Yes, and I believe at the root of the problem (at least for the United States) is a lack of education spending. We are constantly being told that this is the case by the teacher's unions, and I am inclined to agree with them.

We should be willing to devote the same % of our GDP on education as South Korea and Japan. If only we could do that, the problem would be solved.

Oh...wait a minute, the US spends 5% and those other two countries only spend 3.5%. Hm.. but... er...


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electricwitch
electricwitch
For anything, oh! she´ll bust her elastic
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 01:31 pm (UTC)

"Quirky individualism, it seems, is not yet dead. Even in the West."

Well, I´m working hard enough for it, ffs. Though I think being quirky is perhaps too conformist...


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 01:39 pm (UTC)

Are you quirkyalone (just like all the millions of others I hope will buy my book of the same title)?


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electricwitch
electricwitch
For anything, oh! she´ll bust her elastic
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 01:48 pm (UTC)

Haha, that´s hilarious. I scored 95. Damnit, I don´t want to be quirky, it´s too common! *runs off to secure a boyfriend*


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 02:32 pm (UTC)

I am "quirkytogether".


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electricwitch
electricwitch
For anything, oh! she´ll bust her elastic
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 03:44 pm (UTC)

Oh, there´s just no getting away from the quirky, is there. Oh well, I might as well enjoy it then. I shall take up mime...


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(Anonymous)
Fri, Feb. 16th, 2007 08:21 am (UTC)

me, too. i guess that makes us quirkytogether together.

michael


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(Anonymous)
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 01:55 pm (UTC)
re: cyborg and i'm not ok

... i'm in between berlinale screenings, but i'd have to disabuse you about park's cyborg flick. it was messy, disjointed and certainly not gonna make it mainstream in east asia if not for big pop star Rain. speaking as one of what seemed to be the token asians in the first berlin audience, cyborg had lot of good bits and, erm, a korean sense o'humour ... but nowhere near as original as his previous 'old boy'


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charleshatcher
charleshatcher
charleshatcher
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 02:04 pm (UTC)

I think there's often too much emphasis on freshness and individuality in your critiques -- all relativism; to do with context. Content should come first surely?


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 02:21 pm (UTC)

Ah, content -- you're a beef-and-potatoes man! A rosbif! But what is content, if it isn't context? Didn't we learn from McLuhan that the medium is the message? Oh, wait, McLuhan, like Cage, "bores your tits off". Because you're a rosbif! Context really is content!


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 02:24 pm (UTC)

Actually, thinking about it, we'd have to say "the medium is the message" suffers from the same circularity as paradoxical rhetoric like:

Property is theft
Silence is music
Soul itself is the longing of the soul-less for redemption

But I only say this because I, too, am a rosbif.


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(Anonymous)
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 02:30 pm (UTC)
btw

just as a side line, asian culture adoption isn't a fashion accessory, nor is it serious.Heavy adopters and cheap flirters are just as bad as each other..when will western "artistes" stop using asia as a nice excuse for being esoteric....待っています。。。


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 03:01 pm (UTC)
Re: btw

Neither flirtatious nor serious? How then do we characterize this relationship? On-again-off-again, perhaps?

And what happens when this "esoteric" thing becomes domestic (say, for instance, we live with a Japanese person)?

Also, who is the "proprietor" of East-West relations, the person qualified to say exactly what they are?


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(Anonymous)
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 04:53 pm (UTC)
Re: btw

Eh, Eastern influence has become domestic, at least in the US. There are huge Korean and Chinese populations in urban areas and people talk about Korean indies as much as European (yes, from 'regular' people), and Japanese culture has pretty much influenced everyone who was born or came of age since the late 70s. I think the debate of false appropriation would've been better suited 20 or 30 years ago.


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charleshatcher
charleshatcher
charleshatcher
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 06:50 pm (UTC)

Like. Totally.


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alisgray
alisgray
spoonful of sugar, pinch of salt
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 02:40 pm (UTC)

Korea has been exploding in film for at least ten years. And longer ago even than that the West's secret recipe for getting fast turn around on fantastic animation tweening was to ship it to Korea -- they did it with the original Aeon Flux shorts, and Mike Mignola did it with The Amazing Screw-On Head.


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electricwitch
electricwitch
For anything, oh! she´ll bust her elastic
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 03:45 pm (UTC)

PS: I´m a cyborg and I´m ok, I sleep all night and I work all day...


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pay_option07
pay_option07
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 04:36 pm (UTC)
Fish and beer the alternative!

Koreans are pumping there culture into every boy, girl soap dish flix for awhile, in the most enjoyable delicasies for the western tongue.
OUI!

Ringo Shiina did the sound tracks for Sakuran and she kicks.Bigtime.

Nick you need to get tickets!


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dayofthelocust
dayofthelocust
dayofthelocust
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 05:02 pm (UTC)

I'm on the fence about "individualism" but America and Europe have been lacking genuinely romantic films for years. At this point I think we are content to wait for the occassional Wong Kar-Wai offering.

That, or invite him over to make a movie in America, a la My Blueberry Nights.

More than individualism, I'd be curious to hear your thoughts on the lack of romance in American cinema and pop culture right now.


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 05:21 pm (UTC)

I don't think anyone's really doing films like Pierrot Le Fou or Two For The Road now in Europe. I see so little mainstream US cinema that I really wouldn't know. But I suspect I'd see a lot of anxiety, a lot of misgivings, a lot of darkness in mainstream US cinema if I really sat down and plowed through a bunch of randomly-selected DVDs.

It's all tied up with sociology, and with a general feelgood factor that comes with economic boomtime combined with the rapid social change brought by increasing consumerism, and the escape from the straitjacket of traditional society. We had that, in the West, in the 60s. It's now happening in Asia. Hence this playful, Godardian tone that many of these films have. (Godard without the critique, perhaps.)


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cap_scaleman
cap_scaleman
cap_scaleman
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 05:54 pm (UTC)

I just have to show Jim Ether's

20 minute trailer for his DVD "ALERT!".


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(Anonymous)
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 09:52 pm (UTC)

Been catching up on your blog after a week in Prague (what a strangely inorganic, disparate, tourist bauble the old city has become in this last decade).
Particularly enjoyed your post on post-materialism and Berlin.
Belated birthday congrats.
Thomas S.


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maybeimdead
maybeimdead
Maybe I'm Dead
Thu, Feb. 15th, 2007 11:18 pm (UTC)

"Young people in South Korea's workforce are more likely to have achieved an upper secondary education than anywhere else in the developed world. They are also among the most likely to have university degrees." Surely, in this context, it should be no surprise that mainstream cultural products -- at least those directed at the young -- would be slightly more intelligent than those from nations lower down the league table?

I'd say this puts one ball in the economic growth bucket.


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altesse
altesse
discrete random variable
Fri, Feb. 16th, 2007 07:37 am (UTC)

I would have thought that doing well in an exam benchmark doesn't exactly point to bursting creativity and individuality - just a willingness to suck it up and work hard. And your quirky Asians in general do best at the subjects you proudly proclaim ignorance of and look down on: the maths and sciences. In any case, East Asian mainstream pop culture is just as conformist and derivative as anything that comes out of Hollywood.

Besides, Korea has one of the highest suicide rates in the OECD countries. What's the spurious correlation to be drawn from that, eh?


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qscrisp
qscrisp
Fri, Feb. 16th, 2007 08:34 am (UTC)

I read in one of the TEFL journals that plastic surgery is so big in Korea that some TEFL teachers are getting surgery just because the pressure to be good-looking is so strong they are afraid they will lose students if they don't look young and sexy enough.

So, that's my recently memorised bit of disturbing trivia about Korea.

And here's just what we've come to expect about Britain:

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/14022007/140/uk-worst-place-child-welfare.html


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butterflyrobert
RND
Fri, Feb. 16th, 2007 10:38 am (UTC)

For over a decade, that miniscule minority of "Americans with taste" have had to look elsewhere for quality films, music, art, design etc. "Elsewhere" has basically included "foreign" output and the better parts of the past. This phenomenon has been engulfing all of the west, quite particularly England, but not quite so severely as the US.

But as for originality or experimentalism, I haven't seen or heard anything (film-wise or music-wise) done in my lifetime that isn't basically based on - or a copy of - (even if unintentionally) something done before my birth. It would be safe to wager that "true" experimentalism simply hasn't existed since the mid-20th century in those mediums. There's nothing wrong with that per se, as long as quality (and the aesthetics involved, really) doesn't flag - and it definitely has.

And quirkiness can be a lot of fun.


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(Anonymous)
Sat, Feb. 17th, 2007 02:08 am (UTC)
My Korean boyfriend's too busy playing his MMORPG...

That's a pretty naive view of Korea.

Yes Korea has produced some brilliant films in recent years (despite the fact 90% of them are romantic comedies/tragedies). But that's largely due to political protectionism, requiring that a certain percentage of all films and music in Korea be Korean. At times Korea can be extremely anti-foreign - western imports were strictly limited, and until 1999 Japanese films were banned completely (although Koreans arguably had good reason to hate the Japanese).

As a whole, most Korean films aren't particularly original or innovative - although I love lots of Korean films, and Dasepo Naughty Girls is particularly quirky, most are just cloned romantic comedies.

If Korea has any overriding trait at the moment, it could be clone culture. Many identikit romantic comedy films. Music heavily inspired by American RnB. Electronics and car companies 'lifting' both US and Japanese products. Giant corporate culture. Even worringly common eyelid plastic surgery to look more ideal.

It's all a bit confusing though - one minute Koreans are cursing the Japanese/Americans, the next they're copying gangster rap and playing Japanese videogames. There's a large divide between the older and younger generations there.

You can't say Koreans are more intelligent and happier than people in Europe (well, ignoring the depressing places like Scotland, Scandanavia and Eastern Europe for now). Korea has a high rate of education, but that really says very little about the quality of the education. If 99% of people finish a higher education, that just suggests that it's too lenient. In Korea's case however, it has a lot to do with it being a very strict and regimed education (strong in maths and science, not exactly focused on the arts). All you can surmise from that, is that the average Korean is better at mathematics than the average European.

As for happiness... Seoul is the most depressing developed city in Asia. As much as I love the Koreans, they have a tendancy for suicide matched only by the Finnish. It doesn't help that Seoul can at times be a rather grey and extremely cold and bleak place, just a hundred miles or so from North Korean missiles. Koreans certainly aren't the happiest people in Asia. Not to mention many Korean women being rather down-hearted by the chauvinistic society - in certain regards Korea matches Saudi Arabia for its treatment of women.

What can you conclude from all this? Nothing really, cause it's mostly just stereotypes and statistics, and its bearing on the quality of Korean films is pretty irrelevant. Every country has its own creative geniuses - for all the tat that Hong Kong throws out, out pops a Wong Kar-Wai film too.

It's not worth making pointless over analysis, like I just have... Oh.

But I've probably just got it in for you since the time you likened Hong Kong to Birmingham...


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(Anonymous)
Mon, Feb. 19th, 2007 08:02 am (UTC)
Re: My Korean boyfriend's too busy playing his MMORPG...

some of the things you mentioned raises eyebrows...

-since when has the weather affected individuality? are people less creative in scandinavia because it's cold there? incidentally, you should go to korea in the autumn - korea has the most beautiful autumns you'll see anywhere.

-the most depressing developed city in asia? i've been to korea, japan, and china, and don't see how seoul merits such a title. pyongyang might, but seoul is where the party is happening, at least while the economic outlook looks good. call it irrational, but koreans have long gone numb to the threat from north korea. besides, koreans are notoriously fond of entertainment and having a good time. they bitch and moan a lot, but that's because they don't keep things bubbling inside.

-in what regards does korea match saudi arabia in its treatment of women? korea matches many of its confucian neighbors in asia in male chauvinism. but i've never heard of women being banned from certain professions or being killed for honor by their relatives.

since you posted anonymously, i realize you might never see my questions to answer them, but if you do, i'd appreciate it.


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(Anonymous)
Mon, Feb. 19th, 2007 08:21 am (UTC)
Re: My Korean boyfriend's too busy playing his MMORPG...

btw, i don't mean to rail against everything you've written. it happens that some of your presumptions raised red flags.

re: the suicide rates, i suspect it has something to do with the tendency of koreans to be violently emotional and spiteful. a suicide is a final statement that often casts blame on someone besides yourself. perhaps it's not a coincidence that park chan-wook's films feature highly emotional characters in extreme situations with themes of revenge.


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(Anonymous)
Mon, Feb. 19th, 2007 08:27 pm (UTC)
Re: My Korean boyfriend's too busy playing his MMORPG...

Some of the things I've said were a bit blunt, there is a bit more to it than just that. But in response to your red flags;

* I think weather does have a real effect on the happiness of a nation. When you consider that Finland is almost in perpetual darkness for half the year, it's no surprise to hear they have one of the highest suicide rates in the world.

Seoul doesn't suffer from everlasting days/nights in quite the same way, but it is just about the harshest climate of the developed cities in Asia (obviously, being furthest north). That's not a terrible thing - like Britain, Seoul has four defined seasons, and all the beauty that comes along with that. But winter in Seoul is just plain depressing - sub-zero, perma rain/snow, everyone dressed in black without a smile on their face. It's certainly not conductive to being happy.

Then, however unspoken it is, there is the hidden threat of North Korean missiles being pointed right at Seoul. "No one minds, we've got over it" doesn't answer the whole story. Everytime I'm in Seoul I feel it in the back of my mind, thinking this must be a close as we can get to experiencing a Cold War threat today. I don't think it's something you can just dismiss.

Compared to the rest of Asia, I suppose "most depressing developed city" is all relative. I'm comparing it directly to Hong Kong and Tokyo - and yes, in comparison to those cities, Seoul is often at times a dull, grey depressing place (full of lovely, emotional people who I love though!). There are definitely worse places in mainland China, but I'm not sure if they qualify as developed, or first world. Beijing's such a hard place to quantify - on the one hand, it's modernising into a grey, soulless monstrosity, on the other hand, it has thousands of years of visible history and culture.

As for Korean male chauvinism - comparing it directly to Saudi Arabia was an over statement, but something I remember from an expat friend of mine who said he hadn't seen such blatent chauvinistic behavior since he was in Saudi Arabia. Korea is a very sexist place. It is much more chauvinistic than Japan or Hong Kong (and much of the western world). I know many Korean girls who hate 'typical' Korean men, for either treating them badly, being too conservative, old fashioned and/or chauvinistic.

I like a certain degree of chauvinism myself - Britain in comparison is sometimes too politically correct, equality for the sake of equality. Don't get me wrong, certain equality's good, but at the same time, a man shouldn't get strange looks for holding a door open for a woman.

I need to think about that one more though. It's hard to describe really how Korea is chauvinistic - just that is really is extremely chauvinistic. Nothing compared to some extreme Islamic states though, admittedly. And some things I might call chauvinistic, are really just old fashioned (in comparison to the US/UK), which isn't really a bad thing.

I don't dislike all of these things though, they make Korea typically Korean. Korean's remind me of the Irish of Asia (once oppressed, a country split in two, modern tiger economies, hardy emotional people in a cold and wet landscape, a fondness for alcohol and potatoes), which is entirely a good thing.


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(Anonymous)
Wed, Feb. 21st, 2007 05:35 am (UTC)
"The same could be said for all countries."

Eh, I don't buy it, but I see where you're coming from.


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(Anonymous)
Wed, Feb. 21st, 2007 01:29 pm (UTC)
Re: My Korean boyfriend's too busy playing his MMORPG...

I am a Korean and I lived in Seoul for 15 years.

I find all these opinions about Korea so shockingly generalized, simple, and obvious. Wait, I lied. I don't even find them so shocking anymore.

1) 'Korea has produced some brilliant films in recent years...that's largely due to political protectionism'
First, the screen quota has existed long before the boom. It's been a safety net for the industry, but not the direct cause of its renaissance. Second, the screen quota has been recently reduced to 73 days, and those who agreed with it argued that the screen quota encouraged low-quality productions (protection -> less competition -> relaxed standard)

2) "It's all a bit confusing though - one minute Koreans are cursing the Japanese/Americans, the next they're copying gangster rap and playing Japanese videogames. There's a large divide between the older and younger generations there."
Leonard Bernstein conducted Richard Strauss's Don Quixote in his debut in 1943.
I don't think the division is so large, because for some things, regardless of age, most people don't make strong connection in between - such as certain historic events 60+ years ago and the brand of your digital camera. That said, I won't say that there won't be a boycott movement if some conflict happens between Korea and another country in the future. But for most cases, it is either the country's products and culture are too much integrated into Korea's own, or their presence is insignificant, that such movement will be limited in its size, impact, and durability. We'll see how FTA goes though.

3)"In Korea's case however,...(strong in maths and science, not exactly focused on the arts). All you can surmise from that, is that the average Korean is better at mathematics than the average European."
Comparing hundreds of Koreans and non-Koreans that I've met, I find that overall Koreans are more knowledgeable in the arts also. Most of them have read the classics, learned the world history, political ideas and whatnot. What is considered "basic, common knowledge" is not here, and I think Canadian education system doesn't fare too badly among OECDs, either.
But it's just that the education system forces kids to study and the society requires you to obtain post-secondary education because otherwise you are considered to be a failure. I doubt that kind of forced education will have much benefit in a long run other than providing an impressive spec and the public having more of general but shallow knowledge and skills in math. I will stop here on Korean education before it becomes a emotionally over-charged essay.

4) "As for happiness... Seoul is the most depressing developed city in Asia."
I am sorry that you felt that way, but the vast majority of Seoulians wouldn't agree with you, including myself. In fact, this is my first time hearing such remark. Seoul is the busiest, liveliest city that I've ever been both in Asia and North America.

NK Attack & weather: everybody is simply too busy to think about North Korea even for half a day out of entire year. It might sound weird considering Seoul is within an hour's reach from the 36th line, but the situation between SK and NK is rather complex, as you might expect. And think about it - we've been living with them for 57 years now, and if we were in such constant fear, we would have become freakin lunatics by now. About the weather, it's rainy and grey 10 times more so here in Vancouver than in Seoul, and I don't find myself or my friends struggling with depression.

And lastly about the chauvinism remark: please don't underrate + generalize + simplify Korean society and especially us Korean females so! Korea is a relatively chauvinistic society compared to the Western world, but please, "Saudi Arabia for its treatment of women"? Not even close.


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(Anonymous)
Thu, Feb. 22nd, 2007 06:04 am (UTC)
Re: My Korean boyfriend's too busy playing his MMORPG...

Whenever you include a statement like "Koreans are generally more intelligent than people from the rest of the world" you automatically lose your argument. Clear bias and complete hyperbole. No nationalities are inherently more intelligent than any others.


ReplyThread Parent