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click opera - The problem lays a floral wreath at the grave of the problem
February 2010
 
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Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 01:25 pm
The problem lays a floral wreath at the grave of the problem

This morning I put up a poem-scream about the Virginia Tech shootings -- then deleted it. It was a concrete poem-scream which morphed from "bang" to "ban g" to "ban gu" to "ban gun" to "ban guns". I disabled comments because I didn't want to have a blogospheric debate about ethics, law, the Second Amendment. I certainly didn't want to hear anyone trying to justify the widespread carrying of weapons, nor did I want to be congratulated on my stance against them.

"Ban guns" is, of course, way too simplistic a message. But do you really want subtlety from a scream? It's my scream. And it's as much a scream-at as a scream-with. You're supposed to stand behind a nation when it suffers a misfortune of this magnitude, but here the "misfortune" is so hard-wired into the American system, the American way of life, that you'd be standing behind the problem, taking off your hat in honour of the problem, remaining, for two minutes, silent about the problem while the problem lays a floral wreath at the fresh grave of the problem.

More than ever, today, America feels like an Other. One cannot recommend policy to an Other. One must simply look on in silence, appalled, watching internal contradictions tearing the Other apart, yet knowing that the same dynamic built the Other, and that this dynamic will not be abandoned without the whole identity of the Other being abandoned. The shooter must shoot himself, and only then does the whole nightmare begin to end.

And yet the guns don't die as readily as the people they kill. Metal is tougher than flesh. The guns won't die without political will -- which one doesn't see in the US for the same reasons that one doesn't see Tony Blair condemning bombing, even while he condemns suicide bombing -- and certainly not when guns are a constitutional right.

The deleted entry used the same graphic I'm using here, a graphic which shows to what degree the American nation (and perhaps, by extension, a little less obviously, any nation) is founded on systematic violence. There, visually represented, is the same horror we heard on the cell phone video footage students recorded. The grim exterior of the building, and that seemingly endless banging. Horror beyond all the platitudes. Horror intimately tied to the braying donkey of the Absurd, the pragmatic, the routine, the logistical -- what Hannah Arendt called the banality of evil. A horror that calmly reloads, and that thinks the way you think, with the same words, the same basic concept of what a human is. A horror whose essential similarity to you makes you consider yourself, temporarily, as the Other today.

Bulletin boards and blogs were quick to link to the LiveJournal of Wayne Chiang, a student at Virginia Tech, a gun enthusiast who'd recently split up with his girlfriend and seemed like too perfect a match not to be the killer. That he turned out, in fact, to be just another gun-loving student is cold comfort; his journal makes very clear how much guns have become an aesthetic in the US, a vision of beauty and social power, the way food is in Japan. It's because it's systematic -- a way of seeing, a habitus -- that this lightning will indeed strike twice. And then twice again.

Although it may not seem connected at first glance, this links up, for me, with another story in the press at the moment, Bryan Ferry's comments in the Welt am Sonntag newspaper about his admiration for Nazi iconography. "My God, the Nazis knew how to put themselves in the limelight and present themselves," Ferry enthused, after admitting to the reporter that he calls his recording studio the Fuhrerbunker. "I'm talking about Leni Riefenstahl's movies and Albert Speer's buildings and the mass parades and the flags - just amazing. Really beautiful."

Ferry later apologized profusely.

I feel very contradictory things about this. It's become a commonplace to praise Leni Riefenstahl's "Triumph of the Will" or the cut of Nazi uniforms, while qualifying that -- naturally -- with condemnations of Hitler and the Holocaust. I personally don't like Nazi iconography at all, but I've certainly crossed swords with Marxy over the appearance of swastikas in fashion outfits in Harajuku. And I think I disagree with Steve Heller's conclusion that the swastika is a symbol beyond redemption.

The reason I disagree is that I'm so steeped in Saussure, and his idea about the relationship between signifier and signified being arbitrary. If that's true -- and it obviously is, because we make language ourselves -- it means that no signifier should be vilified or anathematized, especially not one that's changed hands and been recontextualized as many times as the swastika. Why must this polysemous shape now forever remain a Nazi symbol? Why has something so slippery become a final destination? Does evil need a logo? Surely keeping the swastika forever Nazi gives Nazism more power that it deserves -- makes it, in fact, a sort of timeless principle.

This is a problem for me. On the one hand -- under Japanese influence -- I very much want ethics and aesthetics to be seamless. I think there is a politics of texture. Yesterday's entry about a pudding factory in Hokkaido was political, for instance. I very much liked the Quaker-like aesthetics of the wooden house the pudding couple had built for themselves, the simple, modest and sustainable style of their lives. Perhaps I should say "seemingly sustainable" -- they appear to fly back to Tokyo every other week.

My feeling that aesthetics and ethics (or texture and politics, if you prefer) are all of a piece is what made me lash out at some of the bands who played the Whitney Peace Tower show last year. Not only was Japanther's music aggressive, with a puppet show of gigantic demonic clashing animals accompanying it, but when a veteran 1960s peace campaigner complained about how this was "the kind of music they listen to in the tanks in Iraq" she got shouted down angrily by drummer Ian Vanek.

The fact that I sense some kind of fascism in rock music (especially live rock music) is absolutely central to my lifelong avoidance of the form. And rock stars don't seem to disagree with me, just disagree that it's bad, or matters. In 1975 a coked- and occulted-up David Bowie called Hitler "the first rock star -- he staged a whole country". Keith Moon liked to dress up as a Nazi, and Bobby Gillespie is fond of throwing Hitler salutes, probably more in tribute to Iggy than Adolf. What Ferry is saying now is a tame, drawing room version of the same thing.

The problem with condemning such antics is that linking aesthetics and ethics is a kind of rockism. It's anti-Saussure in the sense that it asserts permanent links between form and content, symbols and their meanings, smoke and fire. And that's anti-theatre and anti-art in the end. As well as calling Hitler "the first rock star", Bowie talked in 1970s interviews about how art is "fabulously violent" in a purely cathartic, theatrical way -- how in art you can crash the plane and walk away. Art is virtual. And that's why we don't censor stuff, even if it shows people breaking the law. We assume that the audience knows the difference between dreaming and waking, playing a video game and going to school, art and life.

And yet smoke usually does connect to fire. American children have watched 16,000 murders on TV by the time they're 18. Wayne Chiang poses with guns -- so did Kurt Cobain. It's theatre (art, and aribitrary) right up until the moment it breaks through into life -- and death. We're all very surprised -- and not surprised at all.

Even gentle Stephin Merritt -- "just a great composer and not a violent man" -- lost his composure and shot Ferdinand de Saussure. Okay, in a song. In real life Merritt had his very own Bryan-Ferry-Is-A-Nazi moment when Sasha Frere-Jones called him a cracker for not liking hip hop because of all the murder in it. If he'd let Saussure live, Merritt might have found a way to love rap for, oh, you know, the samples or something, and turned a deaf ear to the sickening sound of gunfire banging away in the middle of it, just like Bryan Ferry managed to do with Nazism.

114CommentReplyShare


(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 12:14 pm (UTC)
Biff

Talking about Bowie and Nazidom, what *has* happened to Biff Rose?
http://pub48.bravenet.com/forum/4113811082/


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electricwitch
electricwitch
For anything, oh! she´ll bust her elastic
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 12:20 pm (UTC)
Ferry: my anti-nazi

What a beautiful post, my dear.
Dear Ferry, he is very embarrassing, but the man has a great aesthetic sensibility, I wish I could tune out violence at will.

Soooo... who´s up for modifying my Bowie is a Nazi! icon to one with Ferry in it???!!




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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 12:31 pm (UTC)

That graphic is misleading. You would think that Indians populated every single shaded square inch of the country, when in fact it was quite sparsely populated. And it fails to mention how Indian tribes would often wipe each other out. Of course, that's harder to see since they're all the same skin color.

Japan has stricter gun control laws than the US, and of course it has less crime. But in my view, to point this out misses the deeper cultural issues America has. Of course, a ban on guns would be a change in the culture, but it doesn't mean children will feel any less alienated from school or their peers.

In Japanese schools, kids work together constantly in groups from a young age, they're responsible for cleaning up their classrooms, and they are assigned authority roles like class monitor. The children get a sense of perspective and responsibility that American kids don't have. I think the lack of these things is the primary cultural problem with the US.


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mcgazz
mcgazz
McGazz
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:47 pm (UTC)

> And it fails to mention how Indian tribes would often wipe each other out.
Leaving huge swathes of the continent unpeopled? All a little convenient? If Native tribes fought, it was over territory.


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WHOOPS - (Anonymous) Expand


eustaceplimsoll
Eustace Plimsoll
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 12:32 pm (UTC)

It's not just America: seven young men shot dead in South London in the past months.


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_grimtales_
_grimtales_
_grimtales_
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 12:37 pm (UTC)

Which is still bugger all compared to certain other countries. Lamentable though it is. Ironically it is imported (yardies) or down to worship of American gang culture (youth gangs).


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(no subject) - (Anonymous) Expand

cerulicante
cerulicante
cerulicante
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 12:36 pm (UTC)

Guns kick ass. Shooting innocent people with them doesn't.

But there's no defense against crazy. If more students or at least the faculty members had concealed weapons permits, the shooter might have been stopped earlier...it couldn't have turned out any worse.


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infromthecold
infromthecold
Frustrated Incorporated
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:18 pm (UTC)

Not sure how far that argument flies, Virginia has a pretty liberal concealed weapons policy.


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(no subject) - (Anonymous) Expand



(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 12:38 pm (UTC)

I think Ferry's talking crap.

The Nazi look is really really ugly, and The Triumph of The Will is a really boring and aesthetically hideous film


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ex_newironsh15
chris
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 12:40 pm (UTC)

It did drag on and on.... but maybe for the time it was thrilling.


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fishwithissues
fishwithissues
jordan fish
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 01:17 pm (UTC)

I also wrote a livejournal yesterday about Virginia Tech and then deleted it. It was sort of about how this "Tech" shooting is being used as an opportunity for CNN to hype its fancy 2.0 artillery.

"I knew it was something way more serious than that, so I started taking the video," he said, adding that he often visited CNN.com and knew he could send his video to I-Report. link

But I just thought it was kinda flip to be thinking so formalistically in a moment of horrible violence, so I deleted it (I also should admit that I acted selfishly and deleted it in part because it was an aesthetically ugly entry. Didn't use a violent-meaning, but texturally-appealling old chart. It was just a shitty screenshot of CNN.com).

But it does feel key to me to not ignore the rapacious internet feeding frenzy going on--i'd rather relate this to the self-made surveillance culture than the culture of regeneration through violence, which is the title of a book by Richard Slotkin, who I was fortunate to have as a professor. Related to his teachings, I think a big problem with everything, everybody, is in a moment of crisis we feel compelled to reach for the real, but that real ends up being the biggest and most invisible myth we keep at arm's length: our gut reflex. In this case (as it often is) I see the myth of America as the dark, mysterious, violent and attractive frontier. The wild west full of sexy cowboys ready to prove something. It's not all salloons and duels, but a lot of folks think like that. People like Wayne Chiang, companies like Boeing (whose slogan is unconscionably, "forever new frontiers"), and you right now.

If it seems I'm confusing history with myth (maybe I am) then we can talk about historicity.


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 02:16 pm (UTC)

I found myself thinking of that high-res college webcam you linked to recently, and wondering whether, one day soon, we'll all watch this stuff unfolding in real time on webstreaming CCTV. "The black CNN" will seem quaint then.


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dddario
Dario
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 01:57 pm (UTC)

Great post, Nick, maybe the best in a long time.

I agree specially with your contradictory feeling. Allowing a symbol like the Swastika to remain untouchable is like allowing Nazism to remain untouchable, to let it keep a place in our society it doesn't deserve. But at the same time i can fully understand why a former concentration camp prisoner doesn't want to see a Swastika, resignified or not, and how violent and awful would be to force him to deal with that.

About the Merritt/hip hop/Frere-Jones affair, that was one of the most ridiculous moments in pop music since a long ago. Frere-Jones and Jessica Hopper proved to be two of the most narrow-minded, inept and biased critics around, posing as the complete opposite. Amazing stupidity


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 02:02 pm (UTC)

It should be at least noted that the shooter was not an American; he was a 'resident alien' from South Korea, apparently. Take what meaning you will from that.


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 02:18 pm (UTC)

Oh no! So it could relate to No sex please, we're South Korean! April really is the cruellest month for those who can't get it on.


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(no subject) - (Anonymous) Expand
j03
j03
sold as a novelty only
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 02:37 pm (UTC)


Blame Guns
Blame TV
Blame Video Games
Blame Rock Music
Blame Culture
Blame Wayne Chiang
Blame Kurt Cobain

Blame America

It wasn't the killers fault.

PS. The murderer was a 23-year-old South Korean. Not an American as you had assumed.

Blame South Korea
Blame Broadband
Blame Kim Chi
Blame Pornography
Blame ...


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electricwitch
electricwitch
For anything, oh! she´ll bust her elastic
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:13 pm (UTC)

Stop trying to turn this into Trainspotting.


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zzberlin
zzberlin
hh
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 02:39 pm (UTC)
bang ban g ban gu ban gun ban guns

<< It was a concrete poem-scream >>

I'd like to have seen this

As for the U.S. gun issue, I can argue both sides. But the older I get, the more libertarian I become. It's my feeling that we should let people have guns, but try to fix the people that want to use them to kill others. More and more I feel like we have to let people do everything, but try to help them not want to do the wrong things

For the Ferry issue, I saw the Remembered Light show in San Francisco recently, in which artists have taken scraps of stained glass from bombed chapels during WWII and created beautiful pieces from them. The chaplain who had collected the pieces, Frederick McDonald, spoke openly about how compelling the Nazi party was at first, their organization, their presence in the streets, and their iconography. After a year or so, he began to realize the awfulness of the Nazis and drew away


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 02:41 pm (UTC)

You should leave Saussure out of your little theory. He had nothing to say about whether it's a good idea or not to ban the signs of the evil of the past.

der.


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uke
uke
orville beckingsley
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 02:51 pm (UTC)

The relationship between signifier and signified is arbitrary, but it is impoossible to remove any of those three things from their cultural context--so they're not effectively arbitrary any more.


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bostonista
bostonista
It's Not Rocket Surgery
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:00 pm (UTC)

""Ban guns" is, of course, way too simplistic a message. But do you really want subtlety from a scream? It's my scream. And it's as much a scream-at as a scream-with. You're supposed to stand behind a nation when it suffers a misfortune of this magnitude, but here the "misfortune" is so hard-wired into the American system, the American way of life, that you'd be standing behind the problem, taking off your hat in honour of the problem, remaining, for two minutes, silent about the problem while the problem lays a floral wreath at the fresh grave of the problem."

This is very trite. It's the equivalent of a hippie pointing at a TV screen and saying, "It's society, man!" It's not society. It's one screwed-up guy with a gun, and it happens.

Nice attempt to stitch it all together into a coherent anti-American screed, but it does not work.


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beketaten
beketaten
Juliet
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:03 pm (UTC)

awful and/or confused people will always find to obtain weapons.

most of the rwanda genocide was performed with only machetes. guns are certainly "quicker", but the one thing humans seem to be eternally good at is finding ways to kill each other.

but if it's not so easy to obtain them legally, i guess hopefully it would be harder to obtain them illegally.

~~~
I just don't see it fit to blame tv or any other "art form". violence is a part of ourselves, things like gangster rap just sort of externalize it in a largely (hopefully) fantasy realm and allows us to understand ourselves and vent without actually doing anything wrong. if we don't understand and embrace the violence in our natures, in its proper and creative rather than destructive place, we are doomed to surprise ourselves with sudden and fatal reactions to situations for which we are not mentally prepared.


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zzberlin
zzberlin
hh
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:16 pm (UTC)

<< if we don't understand and embrace the violence in our natures, in its proper and creative rather than destructive place, we are doomed to surprise ourselves with sudden and fatal reactions >>

How does someone so young come up with such wisdom? You must be an old soul : )
(don't mean to sound patronizing; I was just nowhere near that kind of thinking when I was your age)


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mippy
mippy
Wronger Than Ten Hitlers
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:11 pm (UTC)

saw Triumph of the Will about four times during my Alevels - it is beautifully shot, but tremendously dull.


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luolian
luolian
L
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:26 pm (UTC)

http://www.newsobserver.com/134/story/564978.html

The writer is much older, larger, and blacker a man than I am, but he sums up a lot of how I felt yesterday.


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 05:13 pm (UTC)

barry saunders is a great columnist. i remember being 18, interning at the n&o. the first day there saunders was in his customary fedora and suspenders, feet up on the desk, smoking a giant cigar. editors walking by incessantly shouting "put that damn thing out!"

i wish there were more liberal black columnists and talking heads who were willing to just tell it like it is.


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reflejos
reflejos
erasmo spicker
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:29 pm (UTC)
arbitrary

I think is difficult to call "arbitrary" the relationship betwenn sign and signified, I am more confortable with Peirce than Saussure. There are icons, indices and symbols. With the first two the relationship is clearly not arbitray, and with the "symbols" the ones more able to be called "abitrary" there is a whole history (story) that makes the connection.
Also the relationships betwenn the signs carry a lot from the relations between the concepts (and objects) they signify. The svastica alone is differnt from the svastika in the big plakats in the big biuldings and the huge crowds. I think you should leave some Saussure and keep the other one that emphasizes the relationships. That one is more near to your acute intuitions about the profound relationships betwen ethics and esthetics, text and texture.


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:52 pm (UTC)
Media

I haven't read the previous posts yet so don't know if anyone has thoroughly exhausted this topic for now.

However, I'd like to point out, on the front page of NYTimes.com right now (4/17) there's a feature accompanying an article about the shooting. The feature is titled:

"Interactive: Massacre in Virginia"

WTF!!! Yes, I'd like to at least partially blame the media. Thanks NYTimes for providing us with an "interactive" feature on the massacre in Virginia. Now we can be guided aerial maps, building cutaways, etc., to feel interactively like "we were there." Makes me think of all the people who complain about shoot'em ups like Doom and everything; are we all getting simultaneously too calculatedly removed from the true effects of murder through clinical close-up via TV or computer such as the NYTimes' "Interactive: Massacre in Virginia" feature, and simultaneously too close to the mechanics of mass murder through adrenaline pumping games like Doom etc where the entire point is to gun down "foe" after "foe"? I mean, I guess what else could there be, but still, they could have named it a little more tactfully?

"Interactive: Massacre in Virginia"

Just that title would be enough to trigger survivors' PTSD...


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:52 pm (UTC)
16000 murders

Nick - American children have not watched 16,000 murders on TV by the time they're eighteen - they have watched people pretending. They know the difference - well, at least I did, and I don't think I was especially perceptive.
I think I've seen one person murdered on TV - if you discount long distance war footage, or the twin towers collapsing: that bloke in the Viet Nam war who shot a prisoner in the head, apparently to prove to the camera that he could do it. It was not graphic, in the way that you get in splatter films these days, but it was horrific.


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 03:59 pm (UTC)
Re: 16000 murders

Whereas South Koreans have watched 16000 pornos by the same age!


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 04:04 pm (UTC)
Three times in Montreal in 20 years; twice by engineers

(aj in montreal here...)

We had the Polytechnique massacre in 1989 - an emotionally disturbed man who blamed women for his not getting into the Université de Montréal's engineering program.

Then, just 3 years later, an engineering professor at Concordia University (who was a bit of a megalomaniac, and a gun nut to begin with) shot up his department office and killed four of his colleagues. (oddly, in the investigation that followed, many of his allegations about rampant academic corruption in the dept. proved to be true.)

just last year, another emotionally disturbed, suicidal young man walked into Dawson College and started shooting randomly, killing one person and injuring a score of others. (He had no connection to the college that people could discover; he seemed to style himself after the Columbine trenchcoat kids, even though he was 25)

A friend of mine who's a professor at McGill says she can't help but imagine it happening there; it's a relatively high-pressure environment for some. She told me that there was a spate of grad students shooting their supervisors in recent years (in the US, not Canada as far as I know).

What does seem to be a common thread, particularly in these mass shootings, is that the killers are almost always men, loners, with difficulty socializing, and have years of repressed anger waiting for that door to swing open. It's rare that it's truly psychosis or a "snapping point"; it's more an expression of final despair, an attempt to redeem their masculinity after perceived failures. (Good Washington Post synopsis of that here. (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/16/AR2007041601831.html)

So what's the issue, then; that our individualist culture doesn't allow us to connect enough with the loners and welcome them in? Is there something in our culture that produces more alienated loners, or is it just a matter of odds (will there always be that .01% or something?)

Certainly, the availability of guns is a factor, as is the political unwillingness to enact simple, sensible things like background checks and 5-day waiting periods. I'd vote for a psych evaluation as well...It's telling that after the Polytechnique massacre our parliament voted through comprehensive (if controversial) reforms to firearms law including bans on semiautomatic assault rifles and handguns, and a national gun registry, the requirement of safe lockups for storage, etc...how many tragedies will it take for the US to react?




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imomus
imomus
imomus
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 04:08 pm (UTC)

Actually, I should stress that Steve Heller says the swastika is a symbol "beyond redemption" in this culture. He doesn't tell other cultures (ie Japan or India) that they must re-designate their own swastikas as Nazi ones. Marxy, on the other hand, criticized Japanese uses of the swastika, so he seems to be saying that the symbol should be fixed with its taboo Nazi meanings across all cultures. I don't agree with either of these positions, but I'm closer to Steve Heller's view.


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desant012
||||||||||
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 06:20 pm (UTC)

I remember a few years back, Shorinji Kempo, the Japanese Zen-Buddhist martial art, changed their symbol from a Swastika to some new logo for the sake of international appeal. Sooooo, seeeeeeems tttttttttttttttttttttttttttthhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee'''''''''''''''''''sssssssssss ssssssssssoooooooooooommmmmmmmmmmmmmmeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeepppppppppppprrrrrrrrreeeeeeeeeeessssssssssssssssssssssssuuuuuuuuuuuuuuurrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrreeeeeeeeeeee ooooooooooonnnnnnnnnn tttttttttttttthhhhhhhhhhheeeeeeeeeeeeee iiiiiiinnnnnnttttttteeeeeeerrrrrrrrnnnnnnnnaaaaaaaaaatttttttttttiiiiiiiiiiioooooooooonnnnnnnnnnnnaaaaaaaalllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ssssssssssssssssssssssscccccccccccccccccccaaaaaaaaaaaallllllllllllllle


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harryh
harryh
harryh
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 04:44 pm (UTC)

Violence, by any way you care to measure it, has dropped dramatically in the US (and indeed the world at large) over the past 100 years. You are seeing way way way more in one incident that is actually there.


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cerulicante
cerulicante
cerulicante
Wed, Apr. 18th, 2007 03:51 am (UTC)

You don't understand very well. One incident is more than enough to make sweeping judgements about the US, since the main pillar of the reasoning (that the US is wrong in everything, is more violent, bloodthirsty, greedy and evil than any other country on the planet) is firmly and irrevocably established.


To them, this is merely the frosting on an already done cake. They don't even need to argue it, it's so obvious to them.


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uberdionysus
uberdionysus
Troy Swain: Black Box Miasma
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 04:51 pm (UTC)

Do you defend the rampant violence in Japanese art?


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beketaten
beketaten
Juliet
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 09:30 pm (UTC)

no reason why he shouldn't.

ever noticed how the violence in their art is way way ridiculously up and exaggerated, and the violence in their ordinary lives is....not really that rampant? hmmmmmMMM...


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dddario
Dario
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 04:56 pm (UTC)

"I'm very much against this "lone gunman" theory of lone gunmen. They never are."

I totally agree. Misanthropica says a crazy man with a gun is not society. Lie. He's part of society, and there must be a reason why in some societys "lone crazy guys with guns" shoots at people way more often than everywhere else. So, dear, yes, it is society.


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bostonista
bostonista
It's Not Rocket Surgery
Wed, Apr. 18th, 2007 03:21 am (UTC)

Oh, hello. Thanks for name-checking me without replying to my comment!

And don't call me dear.

Yes, people are part of society. But that is as accurate as your statement gets.


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 06:25 pm (UTC)
UPDATE: Food no longer aesthetic of Choice in Japan

Japan's Nagasaki mayor critical after being shot

TOKYO (Reuters) - The mayor of the Japanese city of Nagasaki, who was shot by a man police said belonged to a crime syndicate, remained in a critical condition on Wednesday and his chances of survival were slim, doctors said.



http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070417/wl_nm/japan_shooting_repeat_dc


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vertigoranger
vertigoranger
VERTIGORANGER.REKAY
Tue, Apr. 17th, 2007 07:13 pm (UTC)
Re: UPDATE: Food no longer aesthetic of Choice in Japan

I read that as "critical, after being shot." I figured, well shit, i would be pretty upset as well.


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