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A cup of tea - click opera — LiveJournal
February 2010
 
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Wed, Jun. 14th, 2006 12:33 pm
A cup of tea

72CommentReply

insomnia
insomnia
Insomnia
Wed, Jun. 14th, 2006 03:38 pm (UTC)

The American experience with tea is distinctly unique.

Tea is young and hip over here, with pearl tea / boba being the trendy thing to do instead of going to a coffee shop.

It's also very popular with hippies, new-agers, lesbians, and, to a lesser extent, homosexuals. One of the sure-fire ways of determining a person's sexual openmindedness is to examine the size of their tea collection. Double points for herbal varieties! (That said, homosexuals are probably more prone to expensive coffees with designer fixtures.)

Earl Grey is popular amongst fans of Star Trek: The Next Generation. Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart's character) had a thing for "Earl Grey, hot". The oil of bergamot makes all the difference.

I used to have people over to my house regularly for gatherings that came to be known as "tea & sympathy", which usually consisted of a dozen polyamorous/bi/kinky people sitting around, drinking tea, and talking... often followed by hottubbing.

Oddly enough, I used to live up the street from a place where crossdressers bought their clothes and exchanged tips. In the back of the store was a patio, where they held a formal tea every day.

Lastly, I find that offering up a cup of tea does, infact, help when people have problems, as it relaxes things. In part, the offering of tea is a somewhat selfish activity, as it allows you to make agreeable noises to whatever rant someone may have while you prepare the tea, followed by the actual tea itself.

Their life might be falling down around them, but at least they're now sitting down, talking at a considerably reduced level of volume and stress. Meanwhile, you've got yourself a nice cup of tea to keep you busy, and, hopefully, a chocolate biscuit.


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Wed, Jun. 14th, 2006 03:42 pm (UTC)

The American experience with tea is distinctly unique. Tea is young and hip over here

And I've just remembered that the republic owes its existence, in a sense, to tea: the British raised duties on tea, and the Americans protested by dumping the stuff into Boston Harbour, and that sparked the revolution!

Now, was that a gesture of love for tea, or hate? Is the American republic founded on rejection of tea, or a pressing need for "tea independence"?


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insomnia
insomnia
Insomnia
Wed, Jun. 14th, 2006 03:51 pm (UTC)

I think it was an expression of sacrifice, eccentricity, and a distinct lack of appreciation for government, really.

It should be remembered that the Boston Tea Party featured patriots dressed up like native Anerican indians, dumping the tea into Boston Harbor to protest what is, by any modern standard, a very miniscule tax.

It wasn't just revolutionary... it was gonzo -- a true act of 18th century performance art.


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insomnia
insomnia
Insomnia
Wed, Jun. 14th, 2006 03:56 pm (UTC)

I should clarify that the Boston Tea Party was, indeed, a sacrifice. We really did love our tea back then, as it was a tie to civilization, home, and a common heritage.

We cut that tie, drank the bitter coffee, and largely forsook the leaves for the better part of 200 years, until hippies and marketing people reminded us that there was, infact, something better than Lipton's out there.


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insomnia
insomnia
Insomnia
Wed, Jun. 14th, 2006 03:47 pm (UTC)

I should mention that spiced chai is still the trendy thing to drink in those areas which don't have pearl tea (or much of an Asian community).

That said, no tea is particularly trendy outside the suburbs, in the great, vast heartland of America.

In the South, however, tea is institutionalized, and generally served cold. It is the standard beverage of choice, considered more normal than water. You don't get offered tea in restaurants, you get offered "sweet tea". Attempts to order unsweetened tea or, infact, just a plain, normal cup of tea, will be greeted with odd stares and denials.

Everywhere else, however, you will have to order iced tea, which you can then sweeten yourself.


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