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Thu, Apr. 26th, 2007 12:00 am
Who am I and what do I do?

40CommentReply


(no subject) - (Anonymous)
imomus
imomus
imomus
Thu, Apr. 26th, 2007 05:59 pm (UTC)

just like all the other artists who quietly do what they do. thats all that matters

I'll settle for that!

I have a french magazine here from April 1971. It's called Réalités. There's an article in it I think it would be difficult to imagine being written today. The article, by Alain Schifres, is headed "The big pop party, does it have a meaning?"

Intro: "Beyond the surprising and sometimes shocking demonstrations, it's a certain attitude to life which the pop movement pedals. You can understand the dynamic of it when you know the roots, the paths and the metamorphoses better."

Above a photo of Woodstock, there's a subheading in red: "A music which takes on a political dimension... The phenomenon quickly took on a political tone, that's to say one of revolt against a certain way of governing society."

The article tells us that pop music has existed for ten years now, and uses commercial channels to reproduce itself. The privileged field of action, says Schifres, is advanced capitalist countries like the US, Britain, Western Europe and Japan. "Pop music defines itself as an instinctive, sensual, proliferating reaction to these stifling technocratic societies." Most adults associate pop music with long hair, hippies, drugs and leftism, we learn. The music is the sign of a profound division in our societies. Its future, above all in France, shouldn't just be measured on the musical level.

The article ends with a quote from Jean-Francois Bizot (a man I've met -- he founded Actuel and Nova magazine in Paris): "The future of pop? We're at a crossroads. Look at the Beatles, the group has split and its members are now at the four cardinal points the wind of pop music whistles to. George has recentred himself in Hinduism. Ringo lives like a bourgeois, collecting porcelain. John speaks of nothing but political action. Paul has married a rich American hieress."

"The future of pop," concludes Alain Schifres, "is a fable we could call 'The Guru, the Petit Bourgeois, the Militant and the Financier. The moral of the tale isn't really clear. Because the four Beatles still have something in common: they all make money."


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niddrie_edge
niddrie_edge
raymond
Thu, Apr. 26th, 2007 08:10 pm (UTC)

Someone once said they knew what pop and the seventies was going to be like when Mungo Jerry came onstage at the Isle Of Wight festival and played In The Summertime.

I remember as a kid Ringo on some chat show on TV talking about designing furniture!


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zzberlin
zzberlin
hh
Fri, Apr. 27th, 2007 04:02 am (UTC)
I lost my accent in 1979

I was a freshman at Smith College (western Mass), and in over my head, with nothing more to show than a Kentucky public school education. I realized that when I raised my hand and spoke, at Smith, no one heard what I had to say; they heard a southern (U.S.) accent. So I began to speak differently, so people would hear me, and not the redneck trailer trash associated with my cadences (redneck trailer trash being my best cousins, actually)

What ever happened to Esperanto? I studied it once but it seemed too abstract to me


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