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Recordings received whilst world-wandering - click opera — LiveJournal
February 2010
 
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Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 01:58 pm
Recordings received whilst world-wandering

75CommentReply


(no subject) - (Anonymous)
imomus
imomus
imomus
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 04:37 pm (UTC)

Yeah, the first track on the Black Light Orchestra MySpace page is actually very untypical, and features Mr Diagonal singing in an American accent.


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maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 04:41 pm (UTC)

Really? Most of the UK music that's coming to my mind sounds mighty mighty British to me.* Maybe it's what we're listening to.

*Though I would agree that there are probably more British singers that Americanize their voices than the other way around - right off I can only think of demo-tape era Joey Ramone and an awful lot of Robert Pollard's stuff.


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(no subject) - (Anonymous)
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 05:26 pm (UTC)

With an aside that what I'm hearing and what I'm listening to are two different things; also, that I date myself with some of this:

Arab Strap; Libertines; Blur; Art Brut; Big Country; Mogwai (when they do open their mouths); Buzzcocks; I *think* I detect UK vowels in Charlottefield; Joe Strummer never to my mind disguised his accent; I can't make up my mind about The Go! Team, but they're doing cheerleading chants, and Americanizing in that context is perhaps forgiveable. Selfish Cunt don't seem at all American in tone. Mekons. Pram. I think Thom Yorke's accent isn't so much British as I Love My Falsetto. Scissorfight's Geordie burr is the delight of their colonial fans.* Slits. X-Ray Spex. Smiths. XTC.

Oh and hey, with regard to this side of the pond, doesn't Colin Meloy throw his voice awfully Brit for a Montanan? And Interpol has to Britify their vocals some to fit the new new wave thing they rock.

*Ha. Just kidding.


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(no subject) - (Anonymous) Expand


microworlds
microworlds
Sparkachu Maelworth
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 06:13 pm (UTC)

I was thinking about that this morning-- I mean, most American music today isn't that great to begin with. That goes for British "indie" music as well. It's like the bands are pretending that they're something they're not, instead of sticking to their roots. I understand if they want to have a musical sound like some of their influences, but adopting an accent not of their own seems a little odd.


ReplyThread Parent
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 06:27 pm (UTC)

Setting aside qualitative judgments on current Anglo-American music, Roots schmoots. I'm grinning friendly-like here: We're all of us uprooted, entirely. What are my roots, then? I grew up listening to classical music with my parents, going to see Gilbert & Sullivan productions, with occasional touches on the Beatles & Dylan they had left over from their youth. Most of the bands that had the greatest influence on me later on were broken up by the time I discovered them - I was a late adopter of a lot of what I love now. Does sticking to one's roots mean sticking to what one heard as a child, or was brought up listening to? Or is it adopting what music you think that culturally ought to be yours - as an American, shouldn't I be mining Harry Smith for my inspiration, chuck out the amps and grow out my beard like Sam Beam? Should I be singing patter songs in Lennon-McCartney harmonies?

I guess I think influences may have replaced roots.


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loveishappiness
loveishappiness
O.H.
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 04:42 pm (UTC)

I think it's more trendy nowadays for British singers to sing in their own (often exaggerated) accents. Kate Nash, Arctic Monkees etc etc


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(no subject) - (Anonymous)
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 07:01 pm (UTC)

I can't say that I've really made up my mind about the whole "rockism" thing. It makes me feel ishy, like when I was in college at anti-apartheid rallies and suddenly became aware of my whiteness, or when I found myself (as often I did) the only male in a classroom full of women studying medieval history with feminist revisionist intent... For I do play the rock. Is playing rock enough, to be rockist? Is holding up the ideal of authenticity in music rockist? I can see where ROCK as a monolith can have a homogenizing effect on musical discourse, but where's the line?

As far as Mr. Okereke goes, deluding himself or no, his stance of "I don't want to play that game." is one of the oldest stances of all.


ReplyThread Parent
loveishappiness
loveishappiness
O.H.
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 07:14 pm (UTC)

Agree with the Britpop rockism but I think Lily Allen and Kate Nash count as being in the same pop bracket as Ellis-Bextor.


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microworlds
microworlds
Sparkachu Maelworth
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 09:14 pm (UTC)

Image and video hosting by TinyPic


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(Anonymous)
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 05:18 pm (UTC)

The reason Britons sing in American accents is because jazz, blues and r&b are all from America. So if you got your start playing Chuck Berry or Muddy Waters songs that was what you were immitating.


ReplyThread Parent
loveishappiness
loveishappiness
O.H.
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 07:11 pm (UTC)

The reason why the Brits immitated their favourite music instead of assimilating it is because America was the IT culture and the thing to aspire to. If it were only a case of taking the accents of the originators then the blues would have been sung in a Celtic or African accent


ReplyThread Parent
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 06:13 pm (UTC)

Well.

Listening to that, I'd say that the decision to lessen her natural accent -I can hear her accent when I listen for it- is driven more by marketing than by lyrical possibilities. It's not too surprising - the thinking being that if you can sell a single to a broad American audience, you'll move a lot more units than if you're limiting yourself to an audience of British and American Anglophiles.




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