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Recordings received whilst world-wandering - click opera — LiveJournal
February 2010
 
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Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 01:58 pm
Recordings received whilst world-wandering

75CommentReply

maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 04:41 pm (UTC)

Really? Most of the UK music that's coming to my mind sounds mighty mighty British to me.* Maybe it's what we're listening to.

*Though I would agree that there are probably more British singers that Americanize their voices than the other way around - right off I can only think of demo-tape era Joey Ramone and an awful lot of Robert Pollard's stuff.


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(no subject) - (Anonymous)
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 05:26 pm (UTC)

With an aside that what I'm hearing and what I'm listening to are two different things; also, that I date myself with some of this:

Arab Strap; Libertines; Blur; Art Brut; Big Country; Mogwai (when they do open their mouths); Buzzcocks; I *think* I detect UK vowels in Charlottefield; Joe Strummer never to my mind disguised his accent; I can't make up my mind about The Go! Team, but they're doing cheerleading chants, and Americanizing in that context is perhaps forgiveable. Selfish Cunt don't seem at all American in tone. Mekons. Pram. I think Thom Yorke's accent isn't so much British as I Love My Falsetto. Scissorfight's Geordie burr is the delight of their colonial fans.* Slits. X-Ray Spex. Smiths. XTC.

Oh and hey, with regard to this side of the pond, doesn't Colin Meloy throw his voice awfully Brit for a Montanan? And Interpol has to Britify their vocals some to fit the new new wave thing they rock.

*Ha. Just kidding.


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(no subject) - (Anonymous)
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 06:30 pm (UTC)

Haven't heard Piglet yet.

How could I have forgotten B. Bragg? But that's no longer current anyhow.


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maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 08:22 pm (UTC)

Oh! Did I mention The Clientele? That's pop. Is it Britpop by your lights? Guitars, British - is that enough to fit the mold?


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microworlds
microworlds
Sparkachu Maelworth
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 06:13 pm (UTC)

I was thinking about that this morning-- I mean, most American music today isn't that great to begin with. That goes for British "indie" music as well. It's like the bands are pretending that they're something they're not, instead of sticking to their roots. I understand if they want to have a musical sound like some of their influences, but adopting an accent not of their own seems a little odd.


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maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 06:27 pm (UTC)

Setting aside qualitative judgments on current Anglo-American music, Roots schmoots. I'm grinning friendly-like here: We're all of us uprooted, entirely. What are my roots, then? I grew up listening to classical music with my parents, going to see Gilbert & Sullivan productions, with occasional touches on the Beatles & Dylan they had left over from their youth. Most of the bands that had the greatest influence on me later on were broken up by the time I discovered them - I was a late adopter of a lot of what I love now. Does sticking to one's roots mean sticking to what one heard as a child, or was brought up listening to? Or is it adopting what music you think that culturally ought to be yours - as an American, shouldn't I be mining Harry Smith for my inspiration, chuck out the amps and grow out my beard like Sam Beam? Should I be singing patter songs in Lennon-McCartney harmonies?

I guess I think influences may have replaced roots.


ReplyThread Parent
microworlds
microworlds
Sparkachu Maelworth
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 06:35 pm (UTC)

Oh no, what I meant was that American bands all have influences, may it be British, Japanese, etc. It's the same with British bands. What I meant by roots was sticking to their accents. Yes, you may have grown up on the Beatles, the Doors, et al, and you can adopt many of their styles (take some of the Beatles' sound, mix it with some of Jim Morrison). It's just that I find it odd that a lot of musicians today don't stick with their accents, or simply just go with what's hip in the music world, thus sounding all the same.


ReplyThread Parent
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
maps_or_guitars
Fri, Oct. 26th, 2007 06:42 pm (UTC)

Hmm. I think Pollard's adoption of a British accent in some of his earlier work comes from a conviction that it just sounded better for the kind of rock he wanted to do. As he got more secure in his writing and performing, he mostly dropped that.

With the pop that kumakouji linked to up (down?) there, I think the decision is strictly economic: the biggest market for English language dancepop is going to be America, and the cowardly marketing approach will be to assume that the American public will find a British accent odd and won't buy it.

Of course, what with the current xenophobic turn hereabouts, that might not be too far off at that.


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