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Mon, Dec. 10th, 2007 03:53 pm
From Stockhausen to stock repertoire

39CommentReply


(Anonymous)
Tue, Dec. 11th, 2007 12:45 am (UTC)

Some good points in your post electiktronic, it is interesting to toy with these comparisons between Western classical music and pop but ultimately the parallels run eschew.
I don't believe that classical music ever reached a point at which it became as entrenchedly formulaic as present-day mainstream pop.
I hate to be defeatist but it is very difficult to envisage of a juncture or more specifically of a movement that could revitalise the medium.
I think - as you indicate in your post - that 'Pop Idol' type television productions are unfortunately the last nail.
Thomas S.


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eclectiktronik
eclectiktronik
eclectiktronik
Tue, Dec. 11th, 2007 01:58 am (UTC)

Yeah, although on a general level many 'production norms' or forces acting upon the production of the music seem to be shared by both classical and pop, as you say, classical was never so formulaic. I'd put that down to the fact that, although at the time of its production, classical was acted upon by certain powerful elites, unlike pop it never had a whole industry built around it, was never put through today's mass media mill and as such was never subject to the hugely 'standardising' forces inherent in large-scale production of any commodity.

Another issue here is that much pop, at least today, is something intimately related to showbusiness, eclipsing the actual music (the process of composition or musicianship is at best touched upon, at worst invisible...) In fact, that is the core of the whole thing: FAME as an end in itself. what people consume is a public personality AS a product, a brand. That is what is on sale, the EXPERIENCE of fame-as-lived, sold to frustrated wanabees queuing up in their thousands outside the casting venue for fame academy - subjected to a perfect form of alienation. But as I said, new spheres such as the internet mean that the contemporary is in a state of flux as these spheres establish themselves as new forms of legitimation of music and art generally.




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