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Vogue India and "runner-up-ization" - click opera
February 2010
 
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Tue, Sep. 2nd, 2008 11:58 am
Vogue India and "runner-up-ization"

31CommentReply

imomus
imomus
imomus
Tue, Sep. 2nd, 2008 07:05 pm (UTC)

When it comes to literature it's not so much a European monoculture that dominates and stifles as an English-language one -- see this essay on the disparities of literary translation between Europe and the Anglosphere, and the global ascendancy of English. But "not for long" -- Chinese is coming up fast.

I prefer Uberdionysus' points in that exchange to Zenicurean's.

European culture dominates. The west desires cultural conglomeration - to import and consume exoticisms; is it so strange other cultures desire this?

We'd have to talk about individual cultures, not just generalize. Japan and Saudi Arabia clearly have completely different attitudes to "cultural conglomeration".

Edited at 2008-09-02 07:06 pm (UTC)


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georgesdelatour
georgesdelatour
Tue, Sep. 2nd, 2008 08:21 pm (UTC)

I'm reading "100 Myths About the Middle East" by Fred Halliday. He's discussing the reinvention of Hebrew in Zionist Israel. Here's a quote:

"The example of Hebrew... is certainly part of a nefarious wave across the world, where disproportionate and too often introverted campaigns for linguistic revival and assertion have sprouted across the 20th century - in Ireland, for example, or Euzkadi (the Spanish Basque country). Even in the Canary Islands, on the basis of what are said to be 250 known words from an earlier pre-Spanish language called Guanche, a revival movement arose in the 1970s with, inevitably, the slogan Patria Guanche o Muerte, Venceremos ('Our Homeland, Guanche or Death: We Shall Prevail')...[I can almost see Halliday yawning!]... The cost of all this linguistic obsession, in a world where the cultural and economic, let alone human, imperative is to learn the major tongues, has yet to be calculated."

BTW Mumbai/Bombay was British sovereign territory from 1661 to 1947, and it was Portuguese for over 100 years before that. According to Wikipedia it accounts for 25% of India's industrial output, 40% of its maritime trade, and 70% of its capital transactions. It contradicts the "Developmentalist View" you quote. Its film industry has probably done more than anything any Indian government could ever do, to buttress Hindi as a viable Indian "national" language in opposition to English. Then again, with all those call centres, isn't English India's ultimate secret revenge weapon against the British Empire?

It's important to remember that there was a major imperialism in India before British imperialism. K.S. Lal has written about the devastation it caused.

As always, your opinions are 180 degrees opposite from those of Karl Marx:

http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1853/07/22.htm


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