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Wed, Oct. 29th, 2008 11:12 am
Toshiki Okada and Japan's "lost generation"

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imomus
imomus
imomus
Thu, Oct. 30th, 2008 11:08 am (UTC)

Thanks for the clarification, Mr Marxy! By the way, it was Macias who said you were working at the heart of the Death Star, I was only quoting him! And it's Jean Snow who works for Conde Nast (though I used to). The New York Times is its own thing. Anyway, yes, we all have salt on our fingers from the glamor gulag.

I've watched the 5 Days in March play twice now, and it kind of reminds me of the slacker meme that, in early 90s American culture, produced Beck and the Clerks movie. Except that Okada is much more formalist. One of the points I was making in the piece was that even unambitious and uninteresting recessionary youth can be the subject of ambitious and interesting culture. I don't know if that makes it the creator of such culture, but I don't think there's quite such a hard-and-fast line between the 35 year-olds and the 25 year-olds as you and Patrick seem to.

For a start, people generally haven't quite got their act together in their 20s. It takes some of them a while to develop a distinctive and original voice. Secondly, are you sure that Cornelius wasn't a bit of a slacker in his time? He definitely did his fair share of pakuri, knocking off Primal Scream and Beastie Boys riffs. As for the contribution of Hiroshi Fujiwara, the less said the better. I think you've put that 90s generation too high, and the 00s generation too low. Where's the 90s Chim↑Pom? Is the 90s castrated because they don't have a Chim↑Pom?


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