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A brief history of moral panics - click opera — LiveJournal
February 2010
 
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Wed, Dec. 24th, 2008 12:00 am
A brief history of moral panics

43CommentReply


(Anonymous)
Wed, Dec. 24th, 2008 08:46 am (UTC)
Re: Other possible factors that I would love to hear discussed

(continuation)
Again, there is an attack of identity hidden in the second case. The Crow allowed a new form of self-expression that did not need to be hidden behind closed doors. The Matrix had a costume design that was easily emulated (by the Columbine shooters, for instance). But I bring up The Matrix and its fallout because, by this time, a music medium is not secure, yet the music was attacked. Here Napster was just beginning to take a hold of the peer2peer world and CD's had probably just passed their peak. The pop fad of the mid 90's was ending and who have we had since? Cinema as a medium was just coming out of the indie movement, which means a relative peak had just ended. DVD's were the big medium at the time, but The Matrix did not have that release yet.

Then again, is it because there was no specific medium that was strong that the search for a motive include all forms of media?
-Edge

*"censored" in quotes since the case for Parental Advisory stickers was that it would not censor, but rather just inform. The censorship which others claimed would happen (and has happened) might be fallout akin to the showing of NC-17 films.


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Wed, Dec. 24th, 2008 10:38 am (UTC)
Re: Other possible factors that I would love to hear discussed

I left out The Crow and The Matrix and so on because I haven't seen them, and would have tended to dismiss the arguments stressing the influence of films, computer games and music on the Columbine killers as reactionary.

In Japan, when a knife-wielding maniac went postal in Akihabara, otaku culture was blamed, despite the fact that Akihabara -- the man's target -- was itself the symbolic centre of otaku culture.

In a certain sense we can see moral panics as symbolic enactments of the very acts of violence they seem to condemn. It's easy to imagine high school shooters thinking to themselves "This culture is vile and corrupt" as they shoot their schoolmates down -- and then the commentators come along, look at the shooting, and also say "This culture is vile and corrupt".

"We agree, that's why we did it," say the now-dead shooters.


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