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Japan's new sakoku? - click opera — LiveJournal
February 2010
 
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Wed, Jan. 7th, 2009 03:04 am
Japan's new sakoku?

44CommentReply

imomus
imomus
imomus
Wed, Jan. 7th, 2009 03:03 am (UTC)

Interesting to inject a class angle into the conversation... I tend to keep it at a national level.

I wonder if the dominance of yankii style is a sign that the ganguro trend wasn't -- as some said at the time -- the end of something (radical late 20th century Japanese street style) but the beginning of something (21st century proletarian-dominated style)? And does this mean that Japanese culture is now dictated by the grass roots rather than small, powerful elites? Or is there some unholy alliance between the two?


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(Anonymous)
Wed, Jan. 7th, 2009 04:38 am (UTC)

The original kogal were rich private school girls, but of the "rich delinquent" stream of culture. Not really aesthetes like your "third-way" crowd. Their popularity gave way to the ganguro, who were working class epigones and took it to a new place. Since then, the gyaru thing has been solidly yankii. Gyaru is a non-Tokyo thing: getting pregnant at 19, marrying, divorcing at 24, working as a hostess.

Kogal were originally "wealth as prerequisite of delinquency" whereas Ganguro was "delinquency as protest against no social mobility." But for the first time, you had a working class subculture take over directly the aesthetics of an upper class one.

Whatever the direction, they are way more influential on culture at the moment than the third-way crowd, who have roots back to the original innovators in Japanese consumer culture like Tsutsumi Seiji, etc.

Marxy


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