?

Log in

No account? Create an account
click opera
February 2010
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tue, Jan. 13th, 2009 03:29 am
Utsu: drugging the ordinary sadness of Japanese and children

76CommentReplyFlag

krskrft
krskrft
Tue, Jan. 13th, 2009 04:23 pm (UTC)

The structuralist view informs my take as well. Don't get me wrong: I don't think people should seek medication as a first response to severe mental trauma, mostly because the process by which we think and feel is not analogous to the process by which we digest food or breathe or circulate urine. Taking a pill will never solve every single aspect of a mental problem. And for every single person I've never known, or ever heard of, who had mental issues, their lifestyles played a significant role in either triggering or perpetuating/prolonging those issues.

But one still comes down to the fact that this can't possibly explain the infinite ways in which people react to similar stimuli. Some peoples' brains pump more happy juice than others, and those people, sometimes, can use medication to regulate that condition. Again, with manic-depression, we're talking about something that is pretty easily identifiable. We can observe the behaviors of a bipolar person and come to a fairly objective conclusion that we're seeing an irregularity. Now, irregularity is fine, as long as the patient is okay and can function to his/her own satisfaction. That's all good. But if the patient is coming in for help, and says "Shit, I have these crazy mood swings, and I can't control them, and I can't get any work done, and sometimes I feel like killing myself and five minutes later I'm on top of the world" then we would have to be morally bankrupt to say "hey, just get your shit together, you're supposed to feel the full sensory palette, after all!"

Know what I mean?


ReplyThread Parent
krskrft
krskrft
Tue, Jan. 13th, 2009 04:30 pm (UTC)

Also, what about anxiety disorders, for which people have found Xanax to be quite effective? I think the anti-psychiatry argument loses a lot of its footing when we look at mental problems that cause physically-identifiable trauma. A person with an anxiety disorder can pass out, stop breathing, or even suffer a heart attack. Is that not real? It definitely bridges the mind-body gap, which would make drugs a viable option, right?


ReplyThread Parent