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Mon, Mar. 30th, 2009 06:41 am
What's on the menu?

27CommentReplyFlag

farblust
farblust
Mon, Mar. 30th, 2009 04:49 pm (UTC)

I guess because Shinto is conceptually very different from Abrahamic religions: you don't have to oblige to the Ten Commandments and you don't have paranoia that maybe Jesus is coming back the second time 3 minutes later. So when a usual Japanese pray, they pray for money, romantic love, health or sth like that. They don't pray and say "I am a sinner.."

Matsuri is pretty opportunistic, because if there is not Kami, it's no harm and so much fun to dress in yukata and watch firework with friends and family. If there is kami, then it's even better...
this kind of visiting temple as an entertainment has a long tradition in China. Those girls in the old days could not go out, so visiting temples are excuses for them to meet other people. The most famous festival should be this one
There is a famous poem by a Chinese poet in 12th century about himself walking around the market outside the Temple to find someone important.

30
first full moon festival

Spring wind brings the fireworks
stars fall like rain

carved coaches pass drawn by noble steeds
a trail of perfume, flute music behind

dragons and fish all night at their dance
a crystal lantern hangs on the breeze

and more – jade moths, silver willows, gold threads
the talk and the laughter, the fair folk in crowds

the crowds passing, one face among them I must find
and there – in midnight’s fading lantern

there she is – and I’m found

SO, it is not religious afterall, just a time for people to pause from their humdrum life.


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(no subject) - (Anonymous)
farblust
farblust
Tue, Mar. 31st, 2009 12:28 am (UTC)

This most important one must be the Chinese New Year eve market. There are several markets like this during new year in Hong Kong, the most frequented one is in a park (called Victoria Park, there is a Queen Victoria statue there still). There is also one outside Wong Tai Sin Temple too I think.



Chinese New Year market in 05

The news reporter from the biggest TV station in Hong Kong





About whether people still visit temples, they do. But most of them are 50 sth housewives, but young people go there as well i think, to pray for money and other earthly things! The most popular temple should be the aforementioned Wong Tai Sin Temple.

There is also a revival of popularity of this festival, where people go to this outlying island Cheung Chau(the omnipresent Momus went there during his HK trip) to see children dressing as some myth characters and people climbing a hill made of buns.






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