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Lies, damned lies, and Darwin tours - click opera — LiveJournal
February 2010
 
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Mon, Apr. 27th, 2009 01:11 pm
Lies, damned lies, and Darwin tours

29CommentReply


(Anonymous)
Mon, Apr. 27th, 2009 12:18 pm (UTC)

A nice crowd!

Could you give a genealogy for this tour guide thing?

I can't help seeing it, at the moment, as situationist tactics tamed, defanged. A verbal detournement. Fun if nothing else.


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imomus
imomus
imomus
Mon, Apr. 27th, 2009 05:02 pm (UTC)

Whether it's in the books I've been writing or these tours, I'm toiling humbly in the tipsy vineyard of tall talers like Lucian - Aesop - Leopardi - Schwob - Borges - Calvino. As a specific art world thing, though, it gets described as "Relational Aesthetics" (Tino Sehgal was also in this Playing the City show, and Rirkrit Tiravanija, two big names in Relational Aesthetics). Different eras have called it different things; in the late 80s and early 90s Andrea Fraser was doing stuff like this and calling it Institutional Critique. My view is that you can't call it that when the institution is sponsoring it. It's more like "poetry in the workplace" projects, actually -- like when a company appoints a storyteller-in-residence.

Edited at 2009-04-27 05:03 pm (UTC)


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 28th, 2009 03:17 am (UTC)

Marcel Schwob and Giacomo Leopardi?

Thanks!


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 28th, 2009 03:25 am (UTC)

This descending jagged red line is the beginning of a smile on the face of a flexible creative worker living on their wits accentuated by the curl of a (dole) queue.


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Apr. 28th, 2009 02:18 pm (UTC)

I've been reading Nathaniel Hawthorne's stories extensively for the first time, and I'm amazed by how much he predates or anticipates twentieth-century (post?)modernism--worthy of adding to the list above. Just after watching the unreliable tour guide above, I read "P's Correspondence" from Tales from an Old Manse, in which the narrator conjectures an alternative universe for several literary and political figures of the recent past: Byron, for instance, ends up not in Missolonghi but becomes old and fat and gouty, writing conservative diatribes; meanwhile, Napoleon wanders lost and paranoid in the streets of London. It would be interesting to see what Hawthorne might have done with Darwin, had he lived long enough!

Dorothy


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