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Wed, May. 13th, 2009 09:24 am
Ravished, in America, by India

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jermynsavile
jermynsavile
jermynsavile
Wed, May. 13th, 2009 05:34 pm (UTC)

I spent about ten years closely involved with the Sikh and Hindu communities in England and always loved the colours of women's saris. Parties and weddings would see some extraordinary colours and combinations. At weddings the women can change outifts four or five times during the course of the day. It can be quite a display. I would always be disappointed when I went to similar events predominantly populated by westerners where the then standard uniform for men and women tended to be fatigue pants and either monochrome or camouflage. It was a bleak old time to be going out.

The colours you are celebrating are generally limited to the women though. Young Indian males tend to wear bog standard American hip hop wear like everyone else and middle-aged men a standard party uniform of white shirt/black trousers that made them all look like waiters (sports shirts and dark trousers when at home). The older men can look more interesting though, with a mix of colonial-influenced styles and traditional dress.


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(Anonymous)
Wed, May. 13th, 2009 09:38 pm (UTC)
Saris ARE a feminist issue

I agree that it's more of a gender issue. Indian men puffing on cigarettes will condemn Indian women for doing the same. Women wear saris while their husbands wear slacks. Hub or spoke world - women will be expected to conform to standards that men do not. Be it a veil or a sari.

Until the huddles masses cast off the yoke of ethnicity we'll never know what exciting new social forms will be found, or how they will dress.


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