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Tue, Oct. 20th, 2009 12:00 am
Sliced, diced, pickled and boxed

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(Anonymous)
Tue, Oct. 20th, 2009 07:39 am (UTC)

The Protestant/Catholic divide is a bit of a myth. There's a cultural divide in Europe but it's not religious, it's more Latin vs non-Latin. Because non-Latin regions that are predominantly Catholic - Poland, Flanders, Austria, Bavaria etc. - don't really share those supposed Catholic values of beauty, elegance and pleasure. They're a better fit with the supposed Protestant values.


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Oct. 20th, 2009 09:00 am (UTC)

At the same time you also have to think of how government changed countries after the Protestant/Catholic divide -- Scandinavian countries, largely Protestant, appreciate aesthetic in a non-grandiose way. The aesthetic is still arguably Protestant, however, in its simplicity and practicality. Poland may have been influenced by having been taken over by other countries, and, most recently, a socialist mentality which frowns upon extravegance. Bavaria in much the same way by being the economic center of Germany. It's really the interaction between religion and state that seem to change these values, not just one or the other.


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(Anonymous)
Tue, Oct. 20th, 2009 09:29 am (UTC)

Yeah, it's complicated. And I think there's another factor which is the north/south divide. Because in most Latin countries - France, Italy, Spain, Portugal come to mind in any case - there are stereotypes about northerners, which fit stereotypes about protestant cultures - ie they work harder, they're less flamboyant, harder to befriend, binge drink...


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viceanglais
viceanglais
Tue, Oct. 20th, 2009 12:01 pm (UTC)

Anglicans become Catholics (Calvanist suspicions confirmed.) Charles crowned "Puppet of Rome".


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