?

Log in

No account? Create an account
click opera
February 2010
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thu, Feb. 4th, 2010 02:01 am
Regal Zonophone

65CommentReply


(Anonymous)
Thu, Feb. 4th, 2010 07:13 am (UTC)
Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except Me And My Bump of Chicken

...to say nothing of the cringe-worthy indigenous stuff they call pop music in Japan. It's hardly baffling that the rest of the world has no taste for it. Let's see, Bump of Chicken or The Beatles? I mean, really...


ReplyThread
imomus
imomus
imomus
Thu, Feb. 4th, 2010 08:15 am (UTC)
Re: Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except Me And My Bump of Chicken

Yes, but I think it's a very, very interesting situation to see how the Japanese have completely bucked the global pattern here, and continue to have a healthy indigenous music scene. I hear that Japan is now the biggest CD market in the world, too; sales have not been affected by file sharing the way they have in other territories.

To answer the fascinating question of why Japan is such an outlier in terms of music consumption, I think we have to set aside the subjective question of "quality" and look instead at specific business practises and specific cultural mechanisms. France and Japan both feel their "cultural exception" strongly, but France has by and large tried to combat the virulent Anglopop stranglehold via legislation (quotas and so on), whereas Japan has used purely commercial means. This means that the "quotas" are hidden within semi-secret commercial maxims, deals and understandings.

We could call this "commercial passive aggression", and the Japanese have been remarkably successful with it. But ultimately the desire to listen to pop music from your own culture has to exist within the consumer. It's not just a matter of the convenience of lyrics in your own language -- that's not enough. There must be a sense that you're wired differently, emotionally and culturally, from other people and need a music which reflects that. There might also be a sense that the music of other nations reflects something undesireable, something those nations have in their DNA.

I think one of the most remarkable things is that Japan continues to be seen as a good ally to the West while saying, in its domestic culture markets, such a firm "no" to Western cultural products, and being the only nation in the world with both the economic means and the cultural will to form this "no" (which is still only a partial "no", a "limited yes").


ReplyThread Parent

(Anonymous)
Fri, Feb. 5th, 2010 07:03 am (UTC)
Re: Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except Me And My Bump of Chicken

LOL @ it's "subjective" whether or not The Beatles were/are a better pop group than Bump of Chicken...


ReplyThread Parent
imomus
imomus
imomus
Fri, Feb. 5th, 2010 08:34 am (UTC)
Re: Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except Me And My Bump of Chicken

Well, quite! They have a funny name, don't they, and pretty novelty-level material. I mean, "Beatles" probably sounded like a good idea at the time. "It sounds like we're insects, LOL!" Plus "we all live in a yellow submarine", "bang bang Maxwell's silver hammer" and other silly ditties recommended for the 0-8 year-old range. But who knows, posterity may revise our opinion of (LOLZ) "The Beatles".


ReplyThread Parent

(Anonymous)
Sun, Feb. 7th, 2010 02:01 am (UTC)
Re: Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except Me And My Bump of Chicken

Yes, but these "ditties" from the Beatles were them showing, tongue in cheek, how they could fool around competently in various genres. I dare say not exactly the point being made by BOC and their juvenile music, themselves.

As for the Beatles' foray into the "silly", they're subsequently and simultaneously now known as a great pop/rock band AND beloved by children the world over for the Yellow Submarine animation film. We need not wait for their being known for their humor.




ReplyThread Parent