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February 2010
 
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Thu, Feb. 4th, 2010 02:01 am
Regal Zonophone

65CommentReply

kineticfactory
kineticfactory
this is not your sawtooth wave
Fri, Feb. 5th, 2010 02:18 pm (UTC)
Re: Beansprout hubs

That depends on how you define "popular music". If it includes any sort of music that is popular (such as folk ballads), then of course, it's not an Anglocapitalist invention. However, the sense of popular music meaning "recorded music as a commodity/signifier of subcultural affiliation" sounds more dominantly Anglocentric. It is a largely 20th-century phenomenon, and only came into its prime around the 1950s, with advances in vinyl recording technology and the rise of teenagers with disposable income and free time. Granted, there were local recording industries and teen subcultures all over the world, but they were largely influenced by the idioms of rock'n'roll (and later hip-hop and techno/rave/dance music).

Is there anywhere where popular recorded music as a subcultural commodity evolved without Angloamerican influence? When you listen to 1960s pop music from Asia (Hong Kong, India, &c.), you notice how it sounds transparently influenced by Western beat music, and yet (when the vocals kick in), distinctly exotic. Even the Communist regimes of Eastern Europe conceded the cultural war to Anglo-American forms, releasing sanitised forms of rock'n'roll and lounge-jazz on their state-run record labels.


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